LOUIS ABELMAN

About

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Louis is a journalist, writer and filmmaker. In his wide-ranging travels he has worked to bring modern communication tools to bear to empower people in the telling of vital stories from neglected communities.

After attending Brown University, Louis worked for the International Herald Tribune in Paris, before making New York City home. As an editorial assistant and web producer for The New York Times, he participated in the newspaper’s historic transition to the digital age, working across desks and departments.

An independent filmmaker, he co-directed and produced “Lumo,” a documentary about the recovery of a victim of sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which received a student academy award.
As a media development professional, he created of visual storytelling training programs using mobile tools for young journalists and activists in conflict zones and developing nations such as Libya, Rwanda, Zimbabwe, and Afghanistan.

Written by louis

August 18th, 2008 at 10:17 pm

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2 Responses to 'About'

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  1. Louis! It’s Billy, Assumpta’s pal. Remember me?

    Dude. So awesome that you’re working Libya. I’ve always dreamed of traveling to a conflict zone to work as a journalist. It’s far more interesting that what I’m doing now as a journalist, which is bouncing between concerts in Austin, TX, for SXSW. How did you get involved in this? I’m totally digging your blog. I recently launched one of my own where I post rough drafts of the short stories I’m working on for a book, and write some personalized shorts on music and pop culture in general.

    Are you still working at the New York Times? I have a friend that just moved over there as a designer. Let’s talk.

    Be safe in Libya. You’re doing a fantastic memorable thing. This is history in the making.

    Billy

    17 Mar 11 at 20:32

  2. Thank you for the post and Picture of Mohammed Nabbous. i read of his death but your description makes it much more poignant. Be safe in Libya.

    Melody

    20 Mar 11 at 01:14

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